Katter’s Australian Party is hopeful of a forming a coalition with Palmer’s United Party within months, despite Clive Palmer playing “hard to get”.

Katter’s Australian Party is a “party of the past” with no public support, Clive Palmer says.

The federal MP says his party will never merge with KAP and instead will stand candidates in every Katter-held seat in north Queensland at the next state election.

He says any talk of an alliance between the parties is a desperate ploy by a “party of the past” to attract publicity.

“The Katter party has few members and little resources and, as recent elections have shown, no public support,” Mr Palmer said in a statement.

“The Katter party is desperate to attract publicity and will say anything to get it.

“The Palmer United Party (PUP) has no interest in the Katter party.

“It’s a party of the past.”

The Palmer party managed 11 per cent of the vote in Queensland at the federal election, and the Katter party just 3.75 per cent.

KAP parliamentary leader Ray Hopper says he won’t rest until the parties achieve at least a coalition.

“The lowest denominator here is that we don’t stand against each other,” Mr Hopper told AAP.

“If we do that, we may as well quit politics now.

“There is only a certain amount of the vote out to be capitalise on and it can’t possibly be split.”

KAP MP Shane Knuth said his party held a “very strong position” with three MPs in the Queensland parliament and switching allegiances to PUP was “not an option at all”.

However, he said it was important for his party to form a working relationship with independents and other minor parties because it only appealed to select groups of people.

“We have a strong force within north Queensland but no doubt about it, the Katter party’s strength is not within the city areas,” he said.

“While there’s three of us, three is a lot, particularly if both major parties achieve 43 seats all.”