World champion Cate Campbell is plotting an assault on the national swimming titles in Brisbane – once she has completed her household chores.

Being a world champion has its perks but for Cate Campbell avoiding household chores is not one of them.

Campbell, 21, emerged as Australian swimming’s superstar after claiming the world 100m freestyle gold medal in 2013.

But in her Brisbane home, she is reduced to mere mortal status by her younger sister – and fellow world class swimmer – Bronte.

Campbell will launch an assault on the week-long Commonwealth Games trials in Brisbane starting on Tuesday.

Once she has completed the “to do” list at home, that is.

“She’s there to keep me honest in the pool plus she lives with me as well so she ensures I stay on top of my household chores,” Campbell said of her 19-year-old sister.

“She is good to relax with and have a life. We get along really well.

“It’s great to have someone who understands you so implicitly because she is going through it too.”

The recent struggles of Ian Thorpe and Grant Hackett have ensured Swimming Australia have pushed the benefits of life balance on its athletes.

But it seems that will never be a problem for Campbell while living under the same roof as her sibling.

“She has never let me get a big head,” Campbell said of Bronte who she will take on in the 50m and 100m freestyle at the Brisbane trials.

“Plus I am one of five kids.

“I am always the big sister to them. They always keep me grounded.

“Life balance is hugely important.

“I know that in the past when I focused solely on swimming, my swimming suffered.

“It’s important to have that balance because once something tips it over you can go downhill very quickly.”

Campbell was undefeated over 100m in 2013 and owns the event’s fastest time in a textile suit.

But she rarely notches a win at home.

“I never win an argument,” Campbell laughed.

Their coach Simon Cusack said Bronte was a tough enough prospect in the pool.

“I would not like to come up against Bronte,” he said of the teenager, ranked in the world 100m freestyle top 10.

“She’s got that killer instinct that you can’t coach.

“She’s like a pit bull terrier once that (starting) gun goes.”

However, Cate Campbell emerged as the dominant voice on the team in the wake of their London Games debacle which earned just one gold in the pool.

She was elected to become part of the team’s seven-strong leadership group in the wake of their worst Olympic result in 20 years.

“We needed great role models and you can’t find a better one than Cate,” Cusack said.

“She epitomises what we needed in a leader in and out of the pool not just when the cameras are on.”