Married life has ensured a bumpy lead-up to the national swimming titles for world champion Christian Sprenger but he could not be happier.

Married life has ensured a “bumpy” lead-up to the national titles in Brisbane for world swimming champion Christian Sprenger.

But coach Simon Cusack reckons his charge ain’t seen nothing yet.

“Yeah, he’s had a bumpy preparation but if you think it’s been bumpy so far, give it 10 or 20 years,” he laughed.

“But everyone has got to get married at some stage.

“I wouldn’t like anyone else to miss out on the fun.”

World 100m breaststroke champ Sprenger admitted gaining a wife in November had meant trouble and strife to his preparation for the nationals, which double as the Glasgow Commonwealth Games selection trials.

However, Sprenger wouldn’t have it any other way as he counts down to what seems an inevitable Glasgow gold medal showdown with his nemesis, Olympic champion Cameron van der Burgh of South Africa.

“Whether she is my fiancee or my wife, she still kicks me out of bed when I am struggling and says `do you want to beat Cameron this year?’” he said.

“So off to training I go.

“After getting married at the end of last year I guess my program got a bit split up.

“But it’s good to have her there. She is very honest with me and she knows what it means to me and how much I can push myself.”

Perhaps his only complaint is that their honeymoon has been postponed until after the week-long national titles starting on Tuesday.

But thanks to his better half Amelia, motivation is not a problem for Sprenger.

However, just three years ago a frustrated Sprenger contemplated retirement.

Instead he switched allegiances to new coach Cusack.

Sprenger went from 100m breaststroke 2011 world semi-finalist to London Olympic silver medallist to 2013 world champion.

The frustration over van der Burgh admitting he made an illegal dolphin kick in the 2012 London Games final almost went away when Sprenger edged out the South African at last year’s world titles.

Now 28, Sprenger is showing no signs of slowing down.

“The past 24 months for me have been a real turning period,” he said.

“I have not been a number on a team, I have been a performer.

“I have taken that step and now I want other teammates to see it is possible.

“I might be 28 but I am out to make gains. Hopefully I show that at any stage you can make changes for the better to reach a new level.”