Queensland’s Attorney-General Jarrod Bleijie says the state lacks the power to confiscate any money Schapelle Corby earns from selling her story.

The Queensland government has said it won’t be able to pursue Schapelle Corby over any money she makes from a media interview.

The concession from the state’s attorney-general Jarrod Bleijie comes two days after Premier Campbell Newman asked him to explore how Queensland could confiscate any earnings she made.

“Following legal advice, the state is not in a position to pursue the matter further but we would provide any support to the federal government if it was able and chose to do so,” Mr Bleijie said in a statement on Friday night.

There is speculation that Corby, a 36-year-old former beauty therapist now on parole, has been offered a six figure deal with the Seven Network.

Her sister Mercedes says speculated figures are “ridiculous”.

Indonesian authorities are reportedly looking at ways to stop her from selling her story about the nine years she spent in a Bali jail for marijuana smuggling.

Indonesian Deputy Justice Minister, Denny Indrayana, has advised Corby against doing an interview which might breach her parole and could possibly put her back in Kerobokan jail.

Australian laws came into force in 2003, which gave federal authorities the power to confiscate literary proceeds derived from criminal activities.

But pursuing an Australian who profits from an overseas conviction is difficult.

The Commonwealth Director of Public Prosecutions in 2012 aborted an attempt in the NSW Supreme Court to stop David Hicks from making money by writing about his experiences in Guantanamo Bay as someone convicted for aiding terrorists.