A petition has been started to legalise ‘clothing optional’ beaches in Queensland. Here are the surprising reasons you’ll probably want to sign it.

When it comes to nudist opportunities, Queensland is very much behind the curve.

That’s why a campaign to legalise nude beaches in Queensland has been kicked off by a resident of Poona, a small town outside Maryborough. The nudist campaigner has lodged a petition to the Queensland Parliament demanding a clothing optional beach in the sunshine state.

The e-petition reads: “Queensland citizens draws to the attention of the House that we are seeking your support to have the right for a selected beach within Fraser Coast electorate or elsewhere in the State of Queensland to be classified as Clothing Optional for the recreational use of those who so wish to sunbathe or swim nude without the fear of prosecution.”

However, not everybody is hastening to unbutton their shirts and feel the ocean water on their skin.

Poona Community Progress Association President Peter Heit told Brisbane Times ”that perverts and blokes like that would probably come along as well, and we don’t want them in Poona, that’s for sure.”

Australian Naturist Federation representative Stuart Whelan thinks nudists and naturists in Queensland are being dealt an unfair hand, and spoke to Bmag about why we need the law to change.

Five reasons Queensland should have nudist beaches

1. Everybody else is doing it

According to Whelan, “the petition to the Queensland government is for the legislation of a nude beach because Queensland and Tasmania are currently the only states in Australia that don’t have any clothing optional beaches. If not on the Fraser Coast, then somewhere within the state, we need somewhere where naturists and tourists can have this facility.”

2. Good people don’t want to be law breakers

“It is an innocent pastime, skinny dipping, and at the moment anyone who is caught doing that will face prosecution,” Whelan says. “Most naturists are law abiding citizens and the fact that we can’t enjoy the sun and surf and the simple act of skinny dipping seems rather draconian, especially in this day and age.”

3. It’s actually safer for everybody involved

There are some unofficial nude beaches tucked away along the Queensland coast, most of which are hidden or hard-to-get-to beach areas that can not always be considered safe due to their isolated locations. Whelan argues that it would be safer for all involved to have nudist areas on more mainstream beaches and to have them appropriately signed. “In Europe what happens is there is a designated end of a beach where clothing is optional,” he says. “I would think that on every mainstream beach in Australia there would be an area that would be appropriately signed where you could encounter naked people.”

4. It could keep perverts away

“The idea of ‘perverts’ is another very good reason to have an area that is designated and not hidden away,” Whelan says. “The unsavory element that might be attracted to a nude beach would be exactly the same unsavory element that would be attracted to a clothed beach.

“A lot of beaches that people see as clothing optional are hidden away at the moment and that plays right into their hands. They may go there for inappropriate reasons, while really the people that use the beach for the right reason just want to enjoy the sun and surf.”

5. It boosts body confidence

“The biggest thing to remember is that it is a wonderful experience,” Whelan says. “Once you’ve swam without the hindrance of clothing you’ll keep coming back and enjoying it.

“It’s a non-sexual experience and it works on so many levels to keep a healthy attitude to one’s own body. It normalises the human body and doesn’t objectify it.”

Do you agree with Stuart Whelan that Queensland should have clothing optional beaches, or are you happy for the law to remain unchanged? Have your say in the comments below!

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