Fancy a weekend away at one of Australia’s most exclusive resorts, hidden away at the end of a dirt track in a remote valley? Volkswagen’s Passat Alltrack is the car to get you there in suitable style.

The Alltrack has just cruised into town as a spin-off from the recently-introduced, all-new Passat range. Based on an ordinary wagon instead of being a dedicated SUV, it’s known as a soft-roader or crossover vehicle and shares its concept with the Subaru Outback and Volvo XC70.

Its price of $49,290 positions it in the middle of this trio and buys a wagon with premium style and comfort, plus the ability to easily conquer my expedition to Emirates One&Only resort in the Wolgan Valley, three hours west of Sydney.

A roundabout test route to Wolgan last week covered highway, backblocks bitumen and little-used gravel roads through the mountains. Emirates One&Only is set on a 2800-hectare conservation and wildlife reserve within the Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area.

Sounded on three sides by awesome, high sandstone walls typical of Blue Mountains scenery, the resort is an ultra-luxurious hideaway for a well-heeled few. Overnight accommodation for a couple costs around $2000, but they get a stand-alone villa rather than a hotel room, plus a private swimming pool.

The classy Alltrack looks at home here. It has a tougher stance than the common-or-garden Passat, with distinctive 18-inch alloy wheels, a 27.5 mm-extended ride height, different lower front grille and protective cladding all round the lower bodywork and wheel arches.

It walks the off-road talk with the only all-wheel drive system fitted to a Passat here – Volkswagen’s tried and true 4Motion – plus longitudinal and lateral differential locks, self-repairing Continental tyres, underbody protection and selectable off-road driving mode, which controls the responses of the hill-start and descent systems, traction control, transmission, braking and throttle to optimise tyre grip on loose surfaces.

Power comes from the existing Passat 2.0 litre turbodiesel, which delivers 140 kiloWatts and 40 Newtonmetres through a six-speed twin-clutch transmission. The Alltrack can tow a braked trailer and cargo weighing up to 2.2 tonnes, as much or more than many SUVs.

BlueMotion technology featuring engine idle-stop, brake-energy recuperation and coasting mode help limit average fuel consumption to 5.4 litres per 100 kms.

The Alltrack is loaded with almost every available active safety feature, from fatigue detection to tyre-pressure monitoring, reversing camera, multi-collision braking, city emergency braking, radar cruise control, rear-traffic warning and a couple more.

Occupants are cossetted in comfort as well as a safe cocoon.

There are leather seats, with electric adjustment for the driver, navigation, a power-operated tailgate and an info system loaded with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto to allow full smartphone integration.

An optional Luxury pack, priced at $3500, adds a sunroof, automatic parking, ambient cabin lighting and LED headlights which turn with the steering wheel to illuminate corners.

The interior is not only comfortable, but also practical. Cargo capacity is 630 litres with five people aboard. Fold the rear seats and load length is more than two metres.

Over several hundred kilometres of varied driving conditions, I found the Alltrack a comfortable and competent tourer. While the 4Motion system’s default bias is to the front wheels, it’s always working and re-directs torque front-to-rear or side-to-side instantly if the situation demands, whether on sealed or unsealed surfaces.

self-repairing Continental tyres, underbody protection and selectable off-road driving mode, which controls the responses of the hill-start and descent systems, traction control, transmission, braking and throttle to optimise tyre grip on loose surfaces.

Power comes from the existing Passat 2.0 litre turbodiesel, which delivers 140 kiloWatts and 40 Newtonmetres through a six-speed twin-clutch transmission. The Alltrack can tow a braked trailer and cargo weighing up to 2.2 tonnes, as much or more than many SUVs.

BlueMotion technology featuring engine idle-stop, brake-energy recuperation and coasting mode help limit average fuel consumption to 5.4 litres per 100 kms.

The Alltrack is loaded with almost every available active safety feature, from fatigue detection to tyre-pressure monitoring, reversing camera, multi-collision braking, city emergency braking, radar cruise control, rear-traffic warning and a couple more.

Occupants are cossetted in comfort as well as a safe cocoon.

There are leather seats, with electric adjustment for the driver, navigation, a power-operated tailgate and an info system loaded with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto to allow full smartphone integration.

An optional Luxury pack, priced at $3500, adds a sunroof, automatic parking, ambient cabin lighting and LED headlights which turn with the steering wheel to illuminate corners.

The interior is not only comfortable, but also practical. Cargo capacity is 630 litres with five people aboard. Fold the rear seats and load length is more than two metres.

Over several hundred kilometres of varied driving conditions, I found the Alltrack a comfortable and competent tourer. While the 4Motion system’s default bias is to the front wheels, it’s always working and re-directs torque front-to-rear or side-to-side instantly if the situation demands, whether on sealed or unsealed surfaces.

This engenders confidence, although I was surprised that the car felt a little loose on some gravel roads, despite off-road mode being selected.

The appeal of crossovers like the Passat Alltrack is that they drive and look more like a car than an SUV, while providing as much off-road capability as most drivers will truly ever need.

It’s a classy carriage, whether the need for adventure extends to a posh bush hideaway or the rough ‘n’ tough of the daily commute.